Watermelons

•Watermelons are aptly named: 92% of a watermelon is water, and 6% is sugar. •Square watermelons are watermelons grown into the shape of a cube for easier stack and store. The Japanese created them to fit more compactly in fridges and be able to be cut more easily (without rolling). They were invented by graphic

HEALTHY & FUN FRUITY FACTS

Tatianna

11/13/2021 1 min read

Watermelon

Watermelons are aptly named: 92% of a watermelon is water, and 6% is sugar.

Square watermelons are watermelons grown into the shape of a cube for easier stack and store. The Japanese created them to fit more compactly in fridges and be able to be cut more easily (without rolling). They were invented by graphic designer Tomoyuki Ono in 1978. They are very expensive, with prices as high as $100. Since the advent of the square watermelon, other watermelon shapes have been introduced, such as hearts and pyramids.

Many years ago, explorers used hollowed out watermelons to carry water onboard their ships.  Watermelons aren’t just giant and nutritious but they can also play a key role in keeping you hydrated. In the days before modern plumbing when water became plentiful, people used to carry around watermelons on long trips to stay hydrated. Due to its thick skin and the fact that it’s 92% water, explorers and desert-faring folks carried the fruit around so they had something to drink. This is why watermelons make great food for picnics, beach visits, or other outdoor activities that take place predominately when it is hot outside. Bring it along, it can keep you from getting dehydrated!

"Check the bottom of the watermelon for a creamy yellow spot -- if this spot is white or greenish, your melon may have been picked before it was fully ripe," Lindhe told HuffPost Australia.

"Additionally, ripe watermelons should be dark green in color overall. Also, since the ripest watermelons have the most water, melons that are relatively heavy for their size should be riper."