Raisins

Despite their small size, raisins are packed with energy and rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Raisins are naturally sweet and high in sugar and calories, but they’re beneficial to our health when eaten in moderation. In fact, raisins can aid digestion, boost iron levels, and keep your bones strong. Raisins contain...

HEALTHY & FUN FRUITY FACTS

Tatianna

6/22/20213 min read

Raisins

Despite their small size, raisins are packed with energy and rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Raisins are naturally sweet and high in sugar and calories, but they’re beneficial to our health when eaten in moderation. In fact, raisins can aid digestion, boost iron levels, and keep your bones strong. Raisins contain healthy vitamins and minerals. They are also fat-free and cholesterol-free, high in antioxidants, and an excellent source of fiber. Raisins may help you:

-relieve constipation

-prevent anemia

-build and maintain strong bones

-protect your teeth

-lower your risk of cancer and heart disease

Iron: Raisins are a good source of iron. One-half cup of raisins contains 1.3 milligrams of iron. That’s about 7% of the recommended daily amount for most adult females and 16%for adult men. Iron is important for making red blood cells and helping them carry oxygen to the cells of your body. You need to eat enough iron in order to prevent iron-deficiency anemia.

Calcium and boron: Raisins have about 45 milligrams of calcium per 1/2-cup serving. This translates to about 4% of your daily needs. Calcium is essential for healthy and strong bones and teeth. If you’re a postmenopausal woman, raisins are a great snack for you because the calcium helps prevent the development of osteoporosis, a disorder characterized by bone loss that usually occurs as you age. To add to that, raisins contain a high amount of the trace element boron. Boron works with vitamin D and calcium to keep your bones and joints healthy. It also plays a role in treating osteoporosis.

Antioxidants: Raisins are an exceptional source of naturally occurring chemicals called phytonutrients, such as phenols and polyphenols. These types of nutrients are considered antioxidants. Antioxidants help remove free radicals from your blood and may prevent damage to your cells and DNA. This can lead to diseases like cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

Antimicrobial compounds: A 2009 study noted that raisins contain phytochemicals that could promote healthy teeth and gums. Phytochemicals present in raisins, including oleanolic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid, fight the bacteria in your mouth that lead to cavities. In other words, eating raisins in place of sugary snack foods can actually keep your smile healthy.

Raisins contain enough sugar to give you a burst of energy and are a great addition to a healthy diet for most people.

For endurance athletes, raisins are a great alternative for expensive sports chews and gels. They offer a quick source of much-needed carbohydrates and can help improve your performance. A 2011 study found that raisins were just as effective as a brand of sports jelly beans in improving performance for athletes engaging in moderate- to high-intensity endurance exercise.

Fiber: One-half cup of raisins will give you 3.3 grams of fiber or roughly 10 -24% of your daily needs, depending on your age and gender. Fiber helps aid your digestion by softening and increasing the weight and size of your stool. Bulkier stools are easier to pass and can help prevent constipation. Fiber also helps keep you full for longer because it slows down the emptying of your stomach. If you’re trying to lose weight, eating fibrous foods may help. Fiber also plays a role in cholesterol levels. Dietary fiber is known to decrease levels of the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) type of cholesterol.