Plums

1. They Contain Many Nutrients Plums and prunes are impressively high in nutrients. They contain over 15 different vitamins and minerals, in addition to fiber and antioxidants. Plums are relatively low in calories, but contain a fair amount of important vitamins and minerals. One plum contains the following nutrients:

HEALTHY & FUN FRUITY FACTS

Tatianna

6/15/2021 3 min read

Plums

1. They Contain Many Nutrients Plums and prunes are impressively high in nutrients. They contain over 15 different vitamins and minerals, in addition to fiber and antioxidants. Plums are relatively low in calories, but contain a fair amount of important vitamins and minerals. One plum contains the following nutrients:

Calories: 30

Carbs: 8 grams

Fiber: 1 gram

Sugars: 7 grams

Vitamin A: 5% of the RDI

Vitamin C: 10% of the RDI

Vitamin K: 5% of the RDI

Potassium: 3% of the RDI

Copper: 2% of the RDI

Manganese: 2% of the RDI

Additionally, one plum provides a small amount of B vitamins, phosphorus, and magnesium.

2. Plums and Prunes Are Rich in Antioxidants Plums and prunes are rich in antioxidants, which are helpful for reducing inflammation and protecting your cells from damage by free radicals. They are particularly high in polyphenol antioxidants, which have positive effects on bone health and may help reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

In fact, some studies have shown that plums contain more than twice the amount of polyphenol antioxidants as other popular fruits, such as nectarines and peaches.

Many lab and animal studies have found the polyphenols in plums and prunes to have powerful anti-inflammatory effects, as well as the ability to prevent damage to cells that often leads to disease.

In one test-tube study, the polyphenols in prunes significantly reduced inflammatory markers associated with joint and lung diseases. Anthocyanins, a specific type of polyphenol, appear to be the most active antioxidants found in plums and prunes. They may have powerful health effects, including reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Yet while all of these findings are promising, more human studies are needed.

3. They May Help Lower Your Blood Sugar Plums have properties that may help with blood sugar control. Despite being fairly high in carbs, plums and prunes do not appear to cause a substantial rise in blood sugar levels after they’re eaten. This is attributed to their potential to increase levels of adiponectin, a hormone that plays a role in blood sugar regulation.

Additionally, the fiber in plums may be partly responsible for their effects on blood sugar. Fiber slows the rate at which your body absorbs carbs after a meal, causing blood sugar to rise gradually, rather than a spike.

What’s more, consuming fruits like plums and prunes is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

4. Plums and Prunes May Benefit Heart Health Consuming plums and prunes on a regular basis may have a protective effect on heart health. They have been studied for their potential to reduce high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which are major risk factors for heart disease.

In one study, subjects who drank prune juice and ate three or six prunes each morning for eight weeks were compared to a group that drank only a glass of water on an empty stomach. Those who consumed the prunes and prune juice had significantly lower blood pressure levels, total cholesterol, and “bad” LDL cholesterol than the group that drank water.

Another study found that men who had been diagnosed with high cholesterol had lower LDL cholesterol levels after consuming 12 prunes daily for eight weeks.

Several animal studies have produced similar results.

Generally, mice fed dried plum powder and plum juice appear to have lower cholesterol levels and increased “good” HDL cholesterol. However, these results cannot be generalized to humans.

The positive effects plums and prunes appear to have on heart disease risk factors are likely due to their high content of fiber, potassium, and antioxidants. While the results of these studies are promising, keep in mind that more human research is needed to support the heart-protective effects of plums and prunes.